Sunday, December 10, 2006

Big Blog Announcement


As this blog transforms from a blog dedicated to the Arizona Eighth Congressional elections, to a blog that will have a much wider focus, we realized it was necessary to bring others on board. As much as I like to fancy myself knowledgeable, there are many, many subjects we would like to cover that need actual expertise and experience.

To that end, we are pleased to announce the acquisition of our first regular columnist, who will help give us unique and informed opinion and experience in areas generally not available on our local blogs.

Please help me welcome Frank Antenori on board.

Portions of Frank's Bio from his campaign website:

Frank Antenori was born and raised in Scranton, Pennsylvania; He joined the U.S. Army shortly after graduating from high school in 1984. After four years as a Nuclear Weapons Specialist, he joined the Special Forces in 1988. Since then, he has participated in numerous peacetime and wartime operations in support of American interests, in over thirty-four countries, throughout the world.

While in the Special Forces, Frank was involved in several operations of historical significance. In the late 1980's/early 90's he trained Afghan "Mujahadeen Fighters" to help thwart the Soviet Invasion of Afghanistan. He served in Desert Storm, where his Special Forces A-Team led the first Kuwaiti units into Kuwait City, liberating them from Iraqi oppression.

Frank once again served in Afghanistan during the early part of 2002, and took part in Operation Anaconda. He received the Bronze Star for saving the lives of 13 allied soldiers that were wounded during a Taliban grenade attack on their convoy. In addition, he helped track down terrorists and put them in a place where they would no longer be a threat to anyone.

During the opening stages of the Iraq war, Frank was the Team Sergeant for a Special Forces A-Team that was attacked by a superior enemy armored task force. His small group of Americans held their ground and routed the enemy. He was recommended for the Silver Star but received a Bronze Star for Valor for personally destroying two armored vehicles and their crews with anti-tank missiles, another light skinned vehicle with a machine gun and disabled another with shot from a sniper rifle.

Frank has extensive experience in guerrilla warfare, counter insurgency operations and ground combat. He has also been involved with numerous counter drug operations both in the US and abroad, eliminating tons of opium, marijuana and methamphetamine destined for streets of American cities.

Frank has been on numerous deployments throughout Asia, the Middle East and Africa conducting everything from mine clearing to humanitarian assistance missions. During one particular humanitarian mission to Swaziland in 2000, He worked in an Aids and Tuberculosis clinic, where he treated hundreds of seriously ill Swazi and South African civilians. He was even certified as a Swaziland Paramedic by their Ministry of Health.

On the home front, Frank was a volunteer First Responder for an Ambulance and Rescue Squad for 24 years. He was also a Nationally Registered Paramedic From 1992 until 2002. He trained and worked along side New York City Fire Department Paramedics and Emergency Medical Technicians in the Bronx, Queens and North Brooklyn. He also worked many hours in the emergency rooms of New York City's toughest neighborhoods with emergency room physicians and staff. Frank moved to Tucson when he retired from the military in June of 2004, where he currently works as a program manager at Raytheon Missile Systems. He's been happily married for 13 years to his wife Lesley. They have two sons, Frank III, age 11 and Brodie, age 10.

You can bet if my biography was near that impressive, it would have been posted as well.

Welcome aboard Frank! We are extremely excited to add you to the team.

6 comments:

sirocco said...

Welcome Frank! Looking forward to reading (and most likely disagreeing with) your opinions and views.

Anonymous said...

This is excellent news. Good for you, Framer, for developing a blogger team.

It's a different mindset from us Lone Rangers.

Frank's participation in the CD 8 election was refreshing and intelligent. As I have commented, his presence at the Willcox forum was fabulous.

Like Sirocco, I'll probably disagree with some of the views, but one thing no one can dispute about Frank is that he's for real.

We need more of that.

Liza said...

I'll probably disagree with most of what Frank has to say but it will be interesting to read his posts.

Framer, btw, you're doing a great job of presenting right wing perspectives in a non-inflammatory manner. I hope that you continue to maintain this standard.

Duke the Dog said...

Wow,
A lot of lefties seem to be reading this blog from the looks of it. What topics will Frank be writing on? I really enjoyed him during the campaign as well and watched the CD 8 forum on Access Tucson and though he by far stood shoulders above the other guys.

While I might disagree with him on the gay marriage issue and the border (I think he's a bit soft), I love his opinions on the war and national defense.

Randy Graf had even comnmented that he thought Frank should drop out of the race and run for Homeland Security Director.

Does this mean Frank is going to run again in '08?

Duke

Framer said...

Duke,

His first article is #1 of 4 on the current situation in Iraq. It will be posted tonight if I get my domain issues worked out. I am going to post these articles outside the blog in columnist format.

I looked at it and certainly learned a lot that I didn't know, and there is plenty that you won't see discussed in the newspaper.

Anonymous said...

It is interesting that you list a prestigious resume for a columnist for a political blog that includes NOTHING about the political qualifications or positions of the columnist. That works for the Republic - their writers covering the political beat do not even know that there is more than one legislative district in Maricopa County (actually 21 full or partial) - but I thought you had a higher threshold than the RAG.